Sponsor your own Guide Dog Puppy !

Sponsor your own Guide Dog Puppy !

Here at Puppies.co.uk we are firm believers in giving back to the wonderful Communities around us. It is incredibly important to help and support those which are affected by life changing events such as blindness. As a result we are dedicating this short blog towards opening your eyes towards the wonderful work that GuideDogs UK do for people in the country. These dogs really are truly amazing and to see them in action is incredible! I have been fortunate myself to visit Alfie (mentioned below) as a little puppy!

 

Every hour, another person in the UK goes blind

180,000 people with sight loss rarely leave home alone.

Almost two million people in the UK are living with sight loss. By 2050, there could be nearly four million

Guide Dogs UK rely on donations to continue their life-changing work. Every pound raised makes a difference to people in the UK living with sight loss.

 

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For yourself

You could help transform the life of someone who is blind or partially sighted. From as a little as £1 a week.

The perfect gift

Puppy sponsorship makes the perfect gift for a loved one.

Sponsor a gorgeous guide dog puppy from just £1 a week..

Watch them grow from a six-week-old bundle of fur to a fully-qualified guide dog. It’s a great way to support Guide Dogs, and every puppy’s journey is unique! After 24 months of training, your puppy will give freedom and independence to someone with sight loss, giving you the chance to sponsor another new recruit!

 

Case Study-Alfie!

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Alfie is just six weeks old in this picture. This bundle of fun likes to have his tummy tickled and is often found playing in the garden with his sister, Poppy. By sponsoring Alfie, you’ll become part of his incredible adventure to change the life of someone with sight loss.

 

Sponsor your own Guide Dog Puppy NOW!

Think Puppy!

Think Puppy!

Most puppies will enjoy meeting new people, and most people will enjoy meeting a puppy!

However, it’s important that your puppy is not overwhelmed, so ask people to crouch down to meet them. It’s much better for your puppy if they are able to approach a new person, rather than the other way round – this way you can be sure that they are feeling confident enough to meet somebody unfamiliar.

It’s tempting for people to pick up puppies and hug them, but it might frighten your puppy (especially if they are shy), so best avoided until you know that your puppy enjoys this sort of interaction. 

If you live in a household without children, try and make sure that your puppy gets to meet a variety of sensible children of different ages

Observe your puppy constantly for signs of anxiety or being overwhelmed and, if things get too much, remove them from the situation or give your dog more space and freedom to approach. Remember young puppies tire easily, so keep encounters short with enough time in between for resting. During all encounters, protect your puppy from bad experiences.

Young puppies are inexperienced and get themselves into trouble easily, so think ahead and try to prevent any unpleasant events from occurring.

Tips


• Never pick up your puppy and pass them to someone or pull your puppy towards them. Puppies should always be able to make an approach in their own time and retreat if they want to.
• An anxious puppy will try to look smaller, avoid eye contact, hold their tail low, put their ears back and keep away. They may also lick their lips or yawn. Make sure you pay attention to these signs and take action as soon as possible, usually by taking your puppy away from whatever is causing them to be worried.
• A happy, relaxed puppy will stand up straight with their tail (or whole body) wagging and be keen to investigate
• Avoid using food when introducing your puppy to strangers as this may teach them that all people carry food on them, which is not ideal. You’ll want your puppy to approach people because they want to say hello politely, not to receive treats!

5 Things to Buy When You First Get a Pup!

5 Things to Buy When You First Get a Pup!

Welcome to this Blog where we aim to help you find the 5 essentials (in our opinion) to getting your new Pup settled in at home.

1. Collar & leash

Your puppy will need a collar and leash the day you bring her home. A collar — plain or fancy — holds your pup’s dog license and identification tag, which lists your name and phone number. The collar attaches to the leash, which you will need to walk your pup.

 


2. Crates and containment

A must for any puppy owner, crates and containment devices keep your new pal in a confined area where you can monitor and housetrain him. You will need a dog crate or carrier, and an exercise pen, playpen, or gate when you bring your pup home.

 

Click on the photo to get yours today!

 

3. Dog bed

The first night your puppy comes home, she’ll need a comfy bed to lay her head. While you’re housetraining her, she will sleep in her kennel or crate!

Smaller beds and bumper beds covered in fleece or sheepskin are designed just for this purpose. They keep the dog warm and cozy while she’s dozing away.

 

4. Food and water bowls

 

Your puppy will need food and water bowls when he comes home, and there are many varieties available through your pet specialty retailer. You can choose ceramic or stainless steel dishes, plastic crocks, and even glass bowls — but all these place settings for your pooch have their benefits and drawbacks.

 

Get your bowl here NOW!

Stainless steel bowls, though generally the most expensive, are the best choice. They’re strong, easy to clean and sanitize, and usually too cumbersome for a puppy to carry in his mouth. Many raised feeders and custom-carved bowl holders come with stainless steel bowls.

5. Food, treats

She may be small, but your pup will have a big appetite and big calorie demands to give her body the energy to develop healthy bones, organs, skin, and coat. As a result, for the first 12 months of your pup’s life, you will feed her a diet created just for her demanding energy and nutritional needs.

 

 

 

 

We hope that you found this helpful and informative!